Learning From Rejection 0

Rejection

Whether you get to an interview or not, it’s disappointing not to be selected. The frustration you feel is normal. But it can affect your self-esteem and confidence, which in turn can affect your subsequent job search activities. You can control this cycle. To help you get on with your job search, take some appropriate affirmative action that will place you in control.

Make a Follow-up Call

A follow-up call can provide useful information on the market, your competition, and particular needs the employer had that you either didn’t address or didn’t know enough about. You may learn something about your presentation that you can work on for the next time.

Making a follow-up call can also provide the opportunity to:

☞ reinforce your interest in employment with the organization.
☞ get leads on other possible employer needs.

Employers often find it difficult to select one from among several appealing and well-qualified applicants and are willing to help the unsuccessful candidates with this kind of feedback. If possible, try to get the feedback face-to-face.

Use a non-confrontational, friendly manner and avoid getting defensive or argumentative if you don’t agree with the selection factors or some aspect of the feedback. Maintain your composure and professionalism.

Remember, you want to leave a favorable impression as you are still being evaluated.

Reward Yourself

Take time now to acknowledge your efforts and your results. Pat yourself on the back for the things you did well and felt good about. Next, give yourself a treat. Take time out for some recreation and pick something you enjoy from your “Reward” list.

Re-energized, return to the business of job search.

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